Spoon Trick…

The trick I’m working on today uses a spoon. Here’s the first proof of concept video of it:

I found the tiny spoon at a garage sale a few months ago, and have been trying to think of a use for it. Obviously it would be some sort of shrinking or growing effect. For the method, I think the first shrink is interesting, the final shrink is less interesting to me.

For the first shrink I really stumbled upon when I was working on a different trick with a spoon, and realized I could essentially make the first shrink self contained. That eliminated the need to have to steal anything or ditch anything initially. Ideally, if I could avoid sleeving the spoon for the second shrink, that would be the best, however I can’t think of a way to do that without ditching the spoon. The nice thing about sleeving (or using a topit) is that you end with nothing palmed.

-Louie

Using a Mic Like Comic…

In my continuing effort to get better at using a handheld mic, I went out to a comedy show to watch how comedians hold and use the mic. It also helped that a buddy of mine was in town headlining the show, so it was a good chance to say hi.


All of the comedians in the show used a handheld mic, it’s rare to see a comic use anything else other than a handheld. One thing that I noticed I was doing and they all did was they used the mic as a prop. Kinda like how a conductor uses a baton, it was used to emphasize things they were saying. When I started using the handheld mic earlier this month, I noticed I was a lot more expressive with my hands. Normally my hands wouldn’t really have a reason to be near my face, and the motions I make holding the mic would look strange without holding the mic.

One thing I need to do now is watch my show and figure out where I can clean it up the unnecessary moves in and out of the mic stand.

A fun little side bonus is setting up my show is fast now that I don’t have to deal with my wireless headset mic!

-Louie

P.S. If you are want to learn to use, or get better with a handheld mic, I recommend Michael Kent’s video Microphone Management for Magicians! He does a great job covering pretty much all you need to know and it will save you some time.

The Living Room Sessions…

One of the best kept secrets in magic is Nathan Coe Marsh. All of the material he does is well thought out and super solid! A year or two ago he sold a series of videos called “The Living Room Sessions“. These videos were in depth teaching videos of routines he performs around the world. I just noticed he’s got a special on them right now, and you should check them out:

https://nathancoemarsh.com/black-friday/

All of the routines work in a stand up / stage context and don’t need someone from the audience to physically come on stage. This is going to be a very important condition for at least the next year.

Here’s a sample of one of his routines:

That’s a solid opening routine. He walks out, and gets right into the trick. The trick is good but the kicker is AMAZING!

New Book Day!

Today I’m starting to read Paul Romhany’s book Stand Up Magic. He’s my editor over at Vanish Magazine, and I’ve been a fan of the stuff that he puts out before I started writing for Vanish. It’s all solid real world stuff.

I’m one trick into it so far after reading the introduction, etc and he does a great job explaining it. It’s a number prediction and not only goes into the work in great detail, but also covers variations and afterthought on the routine.

What I like about the first trick is that it’s clearly put together by someone who is actually out there working. It’s got a solid method. One thing I’ve learned to be able to spot in books and DVD’s are methods by people who aren’t out there working all the time. The may be great for a one off show (which isn’t a bad thing), but aren’t solid if you’re out on the road performing all the time.

I’m excited to read more of this book!

Sit or Stand?

Last night I went to my local magic club and during the part where people perform tricks I noticed that some people sat and other people stood. This is a small thing, but an important thing when it comes to actually doing the trick. If you are sitting when you do the trick, but practice … Continue reading “Sit or Stand?”

Last night I went to my local magic club and during the part where people perform tricks I noticed that some people sat and other people stood. This is a small thing, but an important thing when it comes to actually doing the trick.


If you are sitting when you do the trick, but practice standing, you’ll have a hard time as the range of movements in your arms is limited by the table top. If you practice sitting and perform standing, you upper body will now slouch.


Going from sitting to standing I think it an easier transition to do. However I recommend practicing to perform standing. Here’s why, you are more visible standing, and it’s more versatile. When you aren’t bound by a spot to sit, you can choose where you are going to do your magic trick.


I guess the main advantage sitting gives you is lapping, where if you are going to do that then YES sit. However if you do a more formal show, you should consider a more formal approach and do it standing. A great example of this is Shin Lim’s act:

Everything that would have been done sitting 20 years he’s doing standing and it really plays a lot better.


TLDR: Perform standing, unless you have a very good reason why to do it sitting.