Hand Shadow Puppets!

Today I’m doing a workshop on Shadowgraphy for the KAX convention. Here’s my act condensed down to 10 seconds:

If shadowgraphy is something you’re thinking of learning, you can get the special cap I use on my flashlight along with a video of the workshop from KAX for $20. You can order them here:

http://www.magicshow.tips/shadowgraphy-light-cap/

Behind the Virtual Curtain…

Performing a live, virtual show over Zoom it a lot more involved than most people think. Last night I gave a talk about and demonstration about Hand Shadow Puppets and taught a magic trick for the Washington State Parks Great Camp In over Zoom that was broadcasted on YouTube live.Here’s a side by side of what’s happening in the room and what is going out on YouTube.

The person I’m talking to is the host of the show, who is in another location.

The person in the room is my daughter who is running production for me.

For a bit of context, the speaker before me just gave a presentation about bats.

One of my goals when doing virtual shows is to do something that makes my daughter who is running production to laugh. I want to try to crack her up. During the bat presentation before mine, I quickly downloaded the flying bat graphic and added a button to my stream deck. Right before I was live, I told her she could hit the bat effect button anytime during the intro interview or the extro interview. She added the throwing of the physical stuffed bat without me knowing.

I got her to laugh, but also it puts energy and fun into the presentation! A lot of the virtual shows I’ve seen are missing energy and fun. I’m not saying you need to be bouncing off the walls, but so many are performed like they aren’t people watching at the other end of the camera. Figure out how to make the virtual show fun for you to do, and that goes a long way for the audience!

Solve Problems…

Today I’m working to fix a couple of small things on props in my show. In my show I do shadowgraphy, which is commonly known as hand shadow puppets. This is where you use your hands to make shapes on a wall or a screen. If you’ve never seen it, here’s some historical footage of … Continue reading “Solve Problems…”

Today I’m working to fix a couple of small things on props in my show. In my show I do shadowgraphy, which is commonly known as hand shadow puppets. This is where you use your hands to make shapes on a wall or a screen. If you’ve never seen it, here’s some historical footage of it:

One of the issues that I’m having with my screen rig is that the bottom isn’t fixed to the stand. Sometimes if the air conditioning turns on and hits it just right, it will start to pivot a little bit on the stand. While not a huge problem technically from the performers standpoint, as I can easily adjust, it can make it hard for some people in the audience to watch.


My goal today is to make some sort of clip or clips that will hold it in place. Realistically what’s going to happen is I’ll probably create some sort of clamp with magnets, then 3D print a clip to hold it in place. It’s the little things that make big differences in the show and how the audience perceives the show!