Support Your Art!

This weekend I got to perform at a sideshow festival in New Orleans. I think that performing at or attending festivals is something that very important for performers today. You are supporting innovation in your art form. When you go to these festivals or conventions as an attendee, you get to see the top performers. … Continue reading “Support Your Art!”

This weekend I got to perform at a sideshow festival in New Orleans. I think that performing at or attending festivals is something that very important for performers today. You are supporting innovation in your art form.


When you go to these festivals or conventions as an attendee, you get to see the top performers.  This keeps you informed of what level you are at and who your peers are.  Knowing what level your show or act is act keeps your helps with pricing and what sort of venues you can be performing at.  The acts you see keep you updated with the trends in the industry.  What tricks or styles are
common, and once you know the trends you can embrace or avoid the trends. 

performing at festivals is a good place to “level up” your show.  When other people see what you do and how you do it, you can become the trendsetter.  I know the old argument is that people don’t want other people to steal their material.  It’s a lame excuse because as a performer you need to do your art where other people will see it.  You’ll never know who is seeing it no matter where you do it.  Do it for industry and establish it for yourself.

Keep Notes…

Last year for a gig I built a Girl Without a Middle illusion. Basically, it’s a Sphinx Illusion, but I put it on wheels so that I can get in it and walk around. Then I can stop and put other people in it, and pictures and be taken. Here’s what it looked like: After … Continue reading “Keep Notes…”

Last year for a gig I built a Girl Without a Middle illusion. Basically, it’s a Sphinx Illusion, but I put it on wheels so that I can get in it and walk around. Then I can stop and put other people in it, and pictures and be taken. Here’s what it looked like:

After doing it last year, I think I must have thought it wasn’t going to get rebooked as I kept nothing about the box, not even the building notes. When the time came to rebuild it, I was basically starting from scratch. I found the receipt for the mirrors, so that gave me some basic info about the box and a starting point.


My learning lesson was doing something as simple as taking a picture of my build notes would have helped a lot.

Modern Classics…

I’m currently performing at the Southern Side Show Hootenanny in New Orleans.  I’ve seen some amazing acts so far. One of the acts that I had heard a lot about are the Monster’s of Schlock, which is a two person sideshow.  They do all the classic acts in a modern way. Sideshow tends to attract … Continue reading “Modern Classics…”

I’m currently performing at the Southern Side Show Hootenanny in New Orleans.  I’ve seen some amazing acts so far. One of the acts that I had heard a lot about are the Monster’s of Schlock, which is a two person sideshow.  They do all the classic acts in a modern way.


Sideshow tends to attract acts that are more “dark” than comical.  These two guys did a great job of have a story arc through the show, and get a ton of laughs in the process.  I think that performers need to look at something old as the hills and figure out how to breathe fresh air into.  



Sideshow is a great example, as most acts are based on classics and there are probably less than two dozen of those acts.  So how do they make acts stand out. A lot of times it’s a fresh look on the props, by either themeing them or making them more modern.


As a magician, you have no excuse for doing a store bought die box when these side show people are finding innovative ways to pound a nail up their noses